Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Uniquely Lillian

This:
This is beautiful,
amazing,
inspiring,
and
if I am being honest,
slightly intimidating.
She has found her voice
and
it is amazing.
It is challenging.
She refuses to be embarrassed
or
held back.
She owns her voice.

The challenge to me is to 
own
and
appreciate
the uniqueness that is
Lillian.

My teeth are remarkably
uneven.
I have a lisp.
My eye color is described as
hazel,
but sometimes
looks 
blue,
other times
green,
and
occasionally they are
tawny.

Those are the three things
I hated
when I was a kid.
And the bullies
made sure I knew 
there was something
wrong
with me
because of them.

They asked me if I'd been
bitten
by a vampire.
(I have incisors that many Goth's
envy. 
And they are natural
fangs).

They called me creepy
because my eyes changed colors.
And they made sure
to include
a lisp
as they mocked me.

Speech therapy corrected the lisp
unless I'm really tired
or
really angry.
People have trouble taking me seriously
when I am angry 
and
lisping.
Which
tends to make me
angrier.

I've actually grown to love
my weird eyes.
My eyes change colors
according to what I am wearing,
how I am feeling,
and
what the weather is doing.

My fangs
are . . 
still here.

My dream was 
and
is
straight teeth.
(My bottom teeth are pretty crooked, too).

Erin Schick
has presented me with a challenge.
How do I
accept
my unique qualities?
How do I
 embrace,
what I have always wanted to 
change?

I'd like to say,
challenge accepted,
but
I still want
straight teeth.

Saturday, September 27, 2014

You Need to be You

Everyone does it,
you know what I am talking about . . . 
Shaming others
because they don't agree with their likes.

Example:
A friend likes a specific book or movie,
you say something negative,
your friend uses these words,
"Oh {your-name-here},
surely you like this aspect of
{movie/book-name-here}!"
When you agree,
your friend feels better.

The thing is,
everyone does this
in various
degrees.

The fact is,
we accept it from
some
but
not from
others.

What is the difference?
We like some people
and
their transgression
is
acceptable
because
we like them.

We don't like others
and
their 
(very same)
transgression
gets on our nerves.

It is human nature.
But I wonder
what would happen
if we said to friend,
"You know I do like that aspect,
but I still do not like that book/movie.
You can like it,
I just don't."

Would we find the friendship waning?
I have a feeling we would.

Only the strongest bonds
keep friends
with different opinions
together.
Those bonds can only support a few people.
And that is OK.
You still need to be you.

Monday, July 28, 2014

PAY ATTENTION

Just a short note: I moderate comments on my blog. 

If you are a bot, spammer, crammer, or just a down right vile individual, 
I will not publish your comment, 
nor will I click on the link with your blog/identification